12

How I Learnt Unlearnt Relearnt

Since I had not written for so long, I was wondering what I must blog about… I finally decided to write about some truly ‘Learn-Unlearn-Relearn’ moments that I have experienced here.

Not so long ago, I was completely against the caste based reservation system that exists in our education and government system. Like many others, I argued that it works against the merit system and thought that one shouldn’t be given any opportunity unless he deserves it by virtue of his merit.

When I went to B school, Azhar Khan our economics professor always tried to convince us on why the reservation system was necessary – ‘As these people were oppressed by the society for a long time, they are not on the same platform as others, It would take years for them to be brought on to a level playing field with others.’ I always argued against it, at least in my head and was never convinced.

Now that I am living amidst tribal children who hail from small villages in the hills and jungles, I truly appreciate the opportunity that this reservation system gives them. The school that I work with currently has more than 95% tribal children. What’s so different about them you may ask?  Here’s what :

Most of them are first generation learners – their parents never went to school.
To make things worse, their parents do not know the benefits of education and have other problems to worry about.
They hail from villages which are not easily accessible.
They hail from villages which mostly do not have functioning schools- either there is no school or no teacher or teacher is no good.
They hail from villages which have no healthcare.

As I am writing this, I remembered Bhima who is a student from our school currently studying medicine. It is a matter of huge pride for him, for his village and our school. He was a topper in class X in our school, but wouldn’t have made it to the medical college had it not been for the reservation for Scheduled tribes. The hardworking and sharp boy that he is, I am sure he will make a great doctor, one day.

From our school, the number of students who go on to study post class XII is not many, there are many barriers – lack of family support, money, language barrier (most UG courses are in English), lack of awareness, lack of interest even! So, when the few determined and hardworking students who want to go ahead and study- completely self motivated, imagine a situation that they are not able to because of their low income or not meeting the extraordinarily high cut off marks?

The Class X results are out today, I will soon know how our students have fared. I am expecting a couple of them to cross 85% which is a very big deal! These boys want to study in a good school in Bhubaneswar, but will they get a seat with their marks? I truly hope so.

My point is this, had they been in an urban school, they would have probably scored 95%+ like the toppers there these days do. But with the kind of exposure, the school and the teachers they had, this is the best they could have done.

These students who gave their exams in Feb this year came back to school to learn computers. The school received a donation of 10 computers and the lab was functional starting March and these students did not get the opportunity to benefit from it while in school. They came back to school, during their holidays when the rest of the children their age were just rejoicing having completed class X board exams – only because they were highly motivated to learn. Our infants in the cities today are born with tablets in their hand, parents can’t even imagine feeding their babies without their favourite videos from youtube and these sixteen year olds were just happy to touch a keyboard for 20 odd days!

There is a boy in class VI who told me he has to walk 50 kms from the nearest motor-able road to reach his village. He takes two days to walk to his village, (most of it a steep uphill climb) after the bus drops him off on the nearest road. Can you imagine how inaccessible his village is? And we expect him to be able to be just like you and me?

My biggest learning here is that:

Children everywhere have the same potential; it’s just the opportunities and platforms that are different.

Wouldn’t it be unfair if a child has to continue to suffer just like his forefathers who were denied equal opportunities? The reservation in education system for these children has the right intentions; you may argue that it’s highly misused, that these children wont be able to cope with the tough courses, that politicians use it for vote bank politics, meritorious students lose out etc.
The problems that are to be tackled are far more complex. The reality of the situation is that unless we are able to bring the education experience of these children on par with the urban system, until they get the same opportunities as the privileged, we cannot talk about doing away with reservation.

Also read post by a fellow-fellow Shriya Rangarajan who shares her thoughts and experience on the same topic.

Girls of class VII - super smart and eager to learn

Girls of class VII – super smart and eager to learn

Children excitedly playing with Taka who was visiting from Switzerland

Children excitedly playing with Taka who was visiting from Switzerland

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5

Bridging the gap

A couple of days ago, we visited four villages around our school, riding through lovely mountains and valleys. What an amazing experience it was!

When Debendra Sir said, Kya ghati pe gaadi chalaa loge? We gave him a resounding, “yeah of course”. Little did we know that he meant kaccha stone-laden paths carved through mountains with several streams in between! Our poor new Activa-i made for city roads didn’t let us down though. Shalini rode it like a dirtbiker. And Bhagwanji’s splendor galloped only a couple of times 😛

We remembered to click a selfie only at the last kutti stream

We remembered to click a selfie only at the last kutti stream

So let me tell you why we went to these villages. Every year, the Gram Vikas School identifies students for admission to class III for the new academic year. (School starts from class III since it’s a residential school and younger kids may not be independent enough to live by themselves.) We first have a bridge course for three months for the children to bring them up to speed to class III. Those who are not yet ready for class III or are not able to take care of themselves, go back home after the bridge course and may come back the following year. For the final admission to school, the school gives preference to orphans, girl child, poorest of poor and first schooler from the family, in that order.

Lingaraj Sir with the kids at Bethajhari village

Lingaraj Sir with the kids at Bethajhari village

In their villages, these children are usually enrolled in the Government schools. The condition of government schools in these remote villages is appalling, and I don’t mean the building – most villages, even hamlets have at least a school building thanks to the Sarva Siksha Abhiyan.

So most schools have one or more of the below challenges
• The teacher is like visiting faculty we had in colleges, comes once in two months since the village is usually remote and difficult to access like I had mentioned in my post here
• Teacher is regular, but parents don’t care about education and don’t let the children go to school
• Children stay back at home to help their parents on the field or shop or at home
• Students come to school just for the free mid day meal and run home post that
• Students do come to school, but the learning levels are very very low
• School building used for storage and other purposes, neither teacher nor the village cares about the children learning

So even when they have the opportunity to send their children to a full-time residential school like Gram Vikas’, not every parent is keen, as they do not value education.

Like Debendra Sir pointed out, “a lot of these people in the villages are more economically sound than me, but they do not know the importance of education.” Rather unfortunate state of things, don’t you think?

When I saw children in these villages, I could not believe that the students currently in class III at the Gram Vikas school were actually like these kids hiding behind their parents just a year before. I could see a world of difference between the two! The kind of change that the school is able to bring about is heartwarming and it was quite overwhelming to be able to actually see it.

Something else that amazed me is how Gram Vikas has reached these remote tribal villages and ensured they have water and sanitation and dignified houses.Mind you, the mud paths we used didn’t exist before and the field staff walked 30-50 km to reach villages.These were just four of villages that we visited; other teachers will be visiting other villages to identify and coax parents to send the children to our school.

I am so glad I got to visit these villages , helps understand the roots of the children better.
I really look forward to seeing these new little boys and girls come to the school next month.Exciting months ahead! Tra la la la la 🙂

The very picturesque Sarakata village surrounded by mountains on all sides

The very picturesque Sarakata village

 

Pretty house in Baniamari village

Pretty house in Baniamari village

 

Every evening looks something like this

Every evening looks something like this

All pictures courtesy Shalini and her phone .. Thankoo!